review: unbelievable

Spoiler Alert: Unbelievable is the fourth book in Sara Shepard’s Pretty Little Liars series.  If you haven’t read the first three books and don’t want to have parts of the plot spoiled for you, look away now.

Unbelievable by Sara Shepard (2008)

A few days ago, my father asked me what I was reading, and I told him the title of my book was Unbelievable. Indeed, it’s an appropriate title, because this fourth book in Sara Shepard’s Pretty Little Liars series is exactly that—unbelievable.

At the end of the third book, Perfect, Hanna had figured out the identity of A and then was promptly hit by a van, Spencer had pushed her sister down the stairs and after a series of flashbacks to the night of Ali’s death had started to think she might be Ali’s killer, Aria was effectively homeless after Sean revealed to the police that she and Ezra were sleeping together, getting Ezra sent to jail, and Emily had been shipped off to Iowa by her parents who are unable to accept that their daughter is a lesbian.  Crazy times!

When Hanna awakes from her coma, we learn that she can’t remember anything after receiving the dress for Mona’s birthday party.  This means she doesn’t remember her dress ripping and being humiliated by Mona, or Lucas rescuing her and their first kiss, or her realization of A’s identity.  Her plotline throughout the novel is to remember.  Spencer, too, is also on a similar plotline, and at the end of the novel she remembers the rest of what happened on the night Ali died and she realizes she didn’t kill Ali.  Emily and Aria are on different journeys in this book.  Emily is still struggling to figure out where she fits in.  It’s certainly not with her cousins in Iowa, and eventually she ends up back in Rosewood where her family is more accepting.  And yet, her relationship with Maya is disintegrating just as she’s about to get what she wants in terms of her family’s acceptance.  Aria’s story, on the other hand, is put in opposition to Emily’s—while Emily is seeking acceptance, Aria seems to be the one who is unable to accept the changes occurring in her family.  She is certainly not accepting the new status quo with her father and Meredith, who announce they are going to be married after Byron’s divorce is final.

I don’t want to reveal the identity of A or the identity of Ali’s killer because I want it to be a surprise for you if you are reading this series.  What I will say is that this book as well as book three provide a lot of misdirection and red herrings.  I was actually surprised by the identity of A but I was right in my guess about Ali’s killer.  The thing that interests me in particular is the way that Shepard wraps up these two mysteries.  Because I have started watching the television adaptation of this series, I wasn’t expecting that these revelations would be made in book four of the series (currently, there are there fourteen books in this series and I think I read somewhere that there will be fifteen books total).  That being said, I’m glad that Shepard brought these two plots to a conclusion, and a satisfying conclusion at that.  She’s also done this in such a way that readers will still want to read about Hanna, Spencer, Aria and Emily.  The cliffhangers for each character at the end aren’t dramatic, and yet they are cliffhangers and give the sense that there is more in store for these young women.

Another thing I really found interesting in this novel was the prevalence of masks as a motif.  It’s one of the underlying thematic aspects that the novel turns upon. The epigraph to the novel sets us up for this: “No one can wear a mask for very long.”  Although the title of the novel is Unbelievable, it could have also been called Masquerade.  Nearly all of the characters in the novel wear either a literal or figurative mask at some point in the story (and at times, characters wear both).  Aria is taking an art class where one of the projects is for her and her partner to create a mask of each other’s face.  Aria’s partner is Jenna.  They both wear literal masks, but they both also wear figurative masks, and ultimately what lies beneath those masks is revealed.  Elsewhere, Hanna’s friends throw her a Masquerade party to celebrate her recovery.  Everyone wears a literal mask, and Hanna’s reason for choosing a masquerades-style party is that she doesn’t want anyone to see the bruises left from the hit-and-run because they show a less than flawless exterior.  She uses the mask to hide.  Even Spencer is wearing a mask, masquerading as the writer of an essay nominated for the Golden Orchid which she didn’t actually write. She, too, must decide whether she’ll continue to wear this mask or if she’ll reveal what she’s been hiding.  It’s also interesting to think about the characters in this book that don’t wear a mask at all—Lucas in particular comes to mind.  In short, this use of masks as a motif is another brilliant artistic stroke by Shepard that I really appreciated.

If you haven’t started either the show or the books, I definitely recommend starting with the books. If you started with the show but abandoned it somewhere along the way, give the books a try. If you’re just looking for a little light reading or brain candy, give these books a try.  These books are readable and entertaining and thought-provoking. I’m already making plans to get book five in this series, and maybe that’s the best compliment I can give.

 

 

 

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